Validation of a Kinect V2 based rehabilitation game

Mengxuan M, Rachel Proffitt , Marjorie Skubic

PLoS One. 2018; 13(8): (August 24, 2018)

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Abstract


Abstract

Interactive technologies are beneficial to stroke recovery as rehabilitation interventions; however, they lack evidence for use as assessment tools. Mystic Isle is a multi-planar fullbody rehabilitation game developed using the Microsoft Kinect® V2. It aims to help stroke patients improve their motor function and daily activity performance and to assess the motions of the players. It is important that the assessment results generated from Mystic Isle are accurate. The Kinect V2 has been validated for tracking lower limbs and calculating gait-specific parameters. However, few studies have validated the accuracy of the Kinect® V2 skeleton model in upper-body movements. In this paper, we evaluated the spatial accuracy and measurement validity of a Kinect-based game Mystic Isle in comparison to a goldstandard optical motion capture system, the Vicon system. Thirty participants completed six trials in sitting and standing. Game data from the Kinect sensor and the Vicon system were recorded simultaneously, then filtered and sample rate synchronized. The spatial accuracy was evaluated using Pearson’s r correlation coefficient, signal to noise ratio (SNR) and 3D distance difference. Each arm-joint signal had an average correlation coefficient above 0.9 and a SNR above 5. The hip joints data had less stability and a large variation in SNR. Also, the mean 3D distance difference of joints were less than 10 centimeters. For measurement validity, the accuracy was evaluated using mean and standard error of the difference, percentage error, Pearson’s r correlation coefficient and intra-class correlation (ICC). Average errors of maximum hand extent of reach were less than 5% and the average errors of mean and maximum velocities were about 10% and less than 5%, respectively. We have demonstrated that Mystic Isle provides accurate measurement and assessment of movement relative to the Vicon system.

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